Crampton Inspection Service

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(925) 376-7707

Home Inspections For Your Peace of Mind

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“John did a tremendous job of inspecting our home. He's extremely knowledgeable, communicates well, and made us feel at ease.”

– Los Gatos, CA

Our Service Area

Based in Moraga, we proudly serve the San Francisco Bay Area, focusing on the following areas:

  • Counties - Contra Costa, Alameda, Solano
  • Cities and Regions - Lafayette, Moraga, Orinda, “Lamorinda”, San Francisco, Concord, Walnut Creek, Alamo, Danville, Dublin, Vallejo, Berkeley, Oakland, Hayward, Fremont

“John is very good and thorough. The report was very clear and easy to understand. I would recommend him for anyone that needs a home inspection.”

– Lynn H., Oakland, CA

“Reasonable price, on time, friendly, clear contract, performed everything that he promised.”

– Xi Zou, Oakland, CA

Answers to Popular Questions

Q. Why Do I Need An Inspection?
Q. What Is A Home Inspection?
Q. What Does An Inspection Include?
Q. Are Home Inspectors Licensed?
Q. When Do I Request An Inspector?
Q. How Much Time Is Needed To Perform An Inspection?
Q. What Kind Of Report Will I Receive?
Q. How Long Before I Receive The Completed Report?
Q. What Will The Inspection Cost?
Q. Should I Attend The Inspection?
Q. Can I Inspect The Building Myself?
Q. Can A Building “FAIL” The Inspection?
Q. What If The Report Reveals Problems?
Q. If The Report Is Favorable, Did I Really Need An Inspection?
Q. How Do I Prepare My Home For A Home Inspection?
Q. What Is CREIA?
Q. What Is ASHI?
Q. Can I Pay by Credit Card?

home inspection

Q. Why Do I Need An Inspection?
A. The purchase of a home is one of the largest single investments you will ever make. You should know exactly what to expect—both indoors and out—in terms of needed and future repairs and maintenance. A fresh coat of paint could be hiding serious structural problems. Stains on the ceiling may indicate a chronic roof leakage problem or may be simply the result of a single incident. The inspector interprets these and other clues, then presents a professional opinion as to the condition of the property so you can avoid unpleasant surprises afterward. Of course, an inspection will also point out the positive aspects of a building, as well as the type of maintenance needed to keep it in good shape. After the inspection, you will have a much clearer understanding of the property you are about to purchase, and be able to make your decision confidently. As a seller, if you have owned your building for a period of time, an inspection can identify potential problems in the sale of your building and can recommend preventive measures which might avoid future expensive repairs.

If your Realtor recommended a home inspection, it is because your Realtor wants you to be an informed buyer; they can only disclose what has been made known to them via the seller’s disclosures. Your Realtor is looking out for your best interest by suggesting that a qualified home inspector evaluate the property you are about to purchase. With the abundance of short sale, foreclosed, and “as is” properties being sold on the market today, it is even more important to get a professional home inspection. These homes sometimes contain missing or damaged components that can create a safety concern.

Q. What Is A Home Inspection?
A. As defined by Wikipedia, a home inspection is “a non-invasive examination of the condition of a home, often in connection with the sale of that home. This is carried out by a home inspector, who usually has special equipment and training to carry out such inspections. A home inspection report is then issued by the home inspector.

An inspector will check the roof, basement, heating system, water heater, air-conditioning system, structure, plumbing, electrical, and many other aspects of buildings looking for improper building practices, those items that require extensive repairs, items that are general maintenance issues, as well as some fire and safety issues. Home owners or home buyers often use a home inspection service before selling or buying their houses. A home inspector conducts a thorough examination of a home to detect any potential systems or components requiring attention. A home owner receives a detailed report of the condition of his/her home so that he/she can plan for needed repairs and upgrades when it is time to make them.

A home inspector is sometimes confused with a real estate appraiser. A home inspector determines the condition of a structure, whereas an appraiser determines the value of a property.”

Q. What Does An Inspection Include?
A. A complete inspection includes a visual examination of the building from top to bottom. The inspector evaluates and reports the condition of the structure, roof, foundation, drainage, plumbing, heating system, central air-conditioning system, visible insulation, walls, windows, doors, and built in appliances. Only those items that are visible and accessible by normal means are included in the report.

Q. Are Home Inspectors Licensed?
A. Currently the State of California does not have licensing for home inspectors. According to the California Business and Professions Code, all inspections should be performed to the standards adopted by the California Real Estate Inspection Association (CREIA), American Society of Home Inspectors (ASHI), or other nationally recognized professional home inspection association. A contractor’s license is no substitute for certification through CREIA and ASHI, and is no indicator of a well-trained professional home inspector. John is a certified inspector with both ASHI and CREIA.

Q. When Do I Request An Inspector?
A. The best time to consult the inspector is right after you’ve made an offer on your new building. The real estate contract usually allows for a grace period to inspect the building. Ask your professional agent to include this inspection clause in the contract, making your purchase obligation contingent upon the findings of a professional inspection.

Q. How Much Time Is Needed To Perform An Inspection?
A. The average inspection time is 2 to 3 hours. The length of time the inspection takes is dependent upon the square footage of the property, when it was built, whether or not there is a crawl space, and the components of the property.

Q. What Kind Of Report Will I Receive?
A. Our reports are computer-generated and narrative, include numerous color photos and summary page(s), and are customized to your home. Our reporting system is called the “Uniform Building Inspection Report” and is more than a report, it is a property profile. It includes a home manual/reference binder with:

  • 10 “Findings” pages covering over 1,850 common and technical issues found during a routine inspection.
  • Over 575 components and applications listed which serve to provide the buyer with an accurate profile of the property.
  • Over 200 pages of repair and maintenance techniques uniquely suited to the property, as well as disclosure information and inspection limitations which ordinarily cannot be conveyed during the inspection. This will assure you a better understanding of the property, the inspection process, and many maintenance considerations.
  • The report findings with photos will be emailed as a PDF file.

Download a Sample Report (PDF)

Q. How Long Before I Receive The Completed Report?
A. The digital report, which includes color photos, is completed within 2 business days and emailed to the client as a PDF file.

Q. What Will The Inspection Cost?
A. The price of a home inspection performed by Crampton Inspection Service is based on the square footage of the home, when it was built, and whether or not there is a crawl space. Please call us at 925-376-7707 and we can discuss your project and give you a price quote.

It is all too often that cost is the deciding factor in the selection of an inspector. Service and experience should be the key words here. Some inspectors are committed to providing the best inspection possible. These inspectors spend a lot of time and money towards continuing education and the many little things that make a big difference in the quality and professionalism of their service. Do not let a small amount of money stand in the way of a quality inspection of such a large investment. The old saying will always hold true, "You are likely to get exactly what you pay for." When hiring an inspector to review what may be the largest investment of your life, I recommend that you consider quality and reputation prior to price.

Q. Should I Attend The Inspection?
A. Yes. By following the inspector you will learn about the home or building. You will also be able to see a number of findings and discuss your concerns. It is not necessary for you to be present for the inspection, which may take 2 to 4 hours to complete, but Crampton Inspection Service highly recommends clients to be present by the end of the inspection if possible. At that time the inspector will walk you through the home and point out findings. By observing and asking questions, you will learn about the property and get some tips on general maintenance. This information will be of great help to you. If you are not able to attend the inspection, a telephone review may be scheduled after you have received the completed report.

Q. Can I Inspect The Building Myself?
A. Even the most experienced homeowner lacks the knowledge and expertise of a professional home inspector. An inspector is familiar with the elements of home construction, proper installation, maintenance and home safety. He or she knows how the home’s systems and components are intended to function together, as well as why they fail. Above all, most buyers find it difficult to remain completely objective and unemotional about the house they really want, and this may have an effect on their judgment. For accurate information, it is best to obtain an impartial, third-party opinion by a professional in the field of home inspection.

Q. Can A Building “FAIL” The Inspection?
A. No. A professional inspection is simply an examination into the current condition of your prospective real estate purchase. It is not an appraisal or a Municipal Code inspection. An inspector, therefore, will not pass or fail a building, but will simply describe its condition and indicate which items will be in need of further review by a qualified contractor that can provide an estimate for upgrades, repairs or replacement.

Q. What If The Report Reveals Problems?
A. If the inspector finds problems in a building, it does not necessarily mean you shouldn’t buy it, only that you will know in advance what type of repairs to anticipate. A seller may be willing to make repairs because of significant problems discovered by the inspector.

If your budget is tight, or if you do not wish to become involved in future repair work, you may decide that this is not the property for you. The choice is yours.

Q. If The Report Is Favorable, Did I Really Need An Inspection?
A. Definitely! Now you can complete your purchase with peace of mind about the condition of the property, its equipment and systems. You may have learned a few things about your property from the inspection report, and will want to keep that information for your future reference. Above all, you can rest assured that you are making a well-informed purchase decision and that you will be able to enjoy your new home or building the way you want.

Q. How Do I Prepare My Home For A Home Inspection?
A. Some things you should do to prepare your home for a home inspection are:

  • All doors should be made accessible
  • Leave the utilities (gas, water, electric) connected and the pilot light(s) lit
  • Provide access to the attic, garage, electrical panel, and crawl space (if applicable)
  • Provide space around the furnace, air conditioner, and water heater
  • Leave keys for gates, outbuildings, electric boxes, etc.
  • If you know of a plumbing leak, tell the inspector BEFORE the inspection
  • If you have pets, make sure they are secured
  • Prepare to be away for a few hours during the inspection (for buyer’s comfort)

Q. What Is CREIA?
A. The California Real Estate Inspection Association (CREIA) was established in 1976 in California as a non-profit voluntary professional association. CREIA has grown to over 500 members and candidates today. CREIA’s Standards of Practice and professional Code of Ethics provide the consumer with the assurance of quality and professionalism. Members of CREIA are either owners or employees of professional building inspection companies. Today CREIA has members throughout the state and is recognized in California as the leading authority in the building inspection industry.

CREIA has established a high Standards of Practice for the inspection profession that is used throughout the state to ensure the buyer who retains a CREIA member of a complete and detailed inspection and report. All members must abide by these standards and code of ethics. CREIA offers its members and candidates continuing education in the latest building technology, training, and materials to ensure the most professional inspection for the consumer. CREIA acts as a public information service to real estate buyers and provides technical support and training to realty agents, state agencies and other related professions. John Crampton is a certified member of CREIA. Most members have had experience in various construction fields and are or have been building contractors.

Q. What Is ASHI?
A. The American Society of Home Inspectors (ASHI), founded in 1976, is North America's oldest and most respected professional society of home inspectors. ASHI's goals have always been to build customer awareness of the importance of a quality home inspection and enhance the professionalism of home inspectors. The ASHI Standards of Practice and Code of Ethics serves as a performance guideline for home inspectors, and is universally recognized and accepted by many professional and governmental bodies.

ASHI is an organization of independent, professional home inspectors who are required to make a commitment, from the day they join as ASHI Associates, to conduct inspections in accordance with the ASHI Standards of Practice and Code of Ethics, which prohibits engaging in conflict-of-interest activities that might compromise their objectivity. ASHI Associates work their way to ASHI Certified Inspector status as they meet rigorous requirements, including passing a comprehensive, written technical exam and performing a minimum of 250 professional, fee-paid home inspections conducted in accordance with the ASHI Standards of Practice and Code of Ethics. Mandatory continuing education helps the membership stay current with the latest in technology, materials and professional skills. John Crampton is a certified member of ASHI.

Q.Can I Pay by Credit Card?
A. Yes, we do accept Visa and Mastercard. We also accept checks and cash.

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